Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Your Cart   |   Report Abuse   |   Sign In   |   Apply for NAQC Membership
Site Search
Sign up for NAQC membership today!

Receive a monthly issue of Connections!
NAQC Newsroom: Research

Vital Signs: Exposure to Electronic Cigarette Advertising Among Middle School and High School

Tuesday, January 19, 2016  
Posted by: Natalia Gromov
Tushar Singh, MD, PhD; Kristy Marynak, MPP; René A. Arrazola, MPH; Shanna Cox, MSPH; Italia V. Rolle, PhD; Brian A. King, PhD. 
Vital Signs: Exposure to Electronic Cigarette Advertising Among Middle School and High School Students — United.
MMWR. Early Release / Vol. 64 January 5, 2016

Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use has increased considerably among U.S. youths since 2011. Tobacco use among youths in any form, including e-cigarettes, is unsafe. Tobacco product advertising can persuade youths to start using tobacco. CDC analyzed data from the 2014 National Youth Tobacco Survey to estimate the prevalence of e-cigarette advertisement exposure among U.S. middle school and high school students. The 2014 National Youth Tobacco Survey, a school-based survey of middle school and high school students in grades 6–12, included 22,007 participants. Exposure to e-cigarette advertisements (categorized as “sometimes,” “most of the time,” or “always”) was assessed for four sources: retail stores, Internet, TV and movies, and newspapers and magazines. Weighted exposure estimates were assessed overall and by school type, sex, race/ethnicity, and grade.

In 2014, 68.9% of middle and high school students (18.3 million) were exposed to e-cigarette advertisements from at least one source. Among middle school students, exposure was highest for retail stores (52.8%), followed by Internet (35.8%), TV and movies (34.1%), and newspapers and magazines (25.0%). Among high school students, exposure was highest for retail stores (56.3%), followed by Internet (42.9%), TV and movies (38.4%), and newspapers and magazines (34.6%). Among middle school students, 23.4% reported exposure to e-cigarette advertising from one source, 17.4% from two sources, 13.7% from three sources, and 11.9% from four sources. Among high school students, 21.1% reported exposure to e-cigarette advertising from one source, 17.0% from two sources, 14.5% from three sources, and 18.2% from four sources. Approximately seven in 10 U.S. middle and high school students were exposed to e-cigarette advertisements in 2014. Exposure to e-cigarette advertisements might contribute to increased use of e-cigarettes among youths. Multiple approaches are warranted to reduce youth e-cigarette use and exposure to e-cigarette advertisements, including efforts to reduce youth access to settings where tobacco products, such as e-cigarettes, are sold, and regulation of youth-oriented e-cigarette marketing.

Sign In


Forgot your password?

Not a NAQC Member?

Latest News

Membership 11 years!.

    3219 E. Camelback Road, #416, Phoenix, AZ 85018 | Ph: 800.398.5489 | Fax: 800.398.5489 | email: naqc@naquitline.org