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NAQC Newsroom: Research

Feasibility of Implementing the All Nations Breath of Life Culturally Tailored Smoking Cessation Pro

Monday, May 14, 2018  
Posted by: Natalia Gromov
Christine Makosky Daley, Sean M Daley, Christina M Pacheco, T Edward Smith, Myrietta Talawyma, Charlotte McCloskey, Won S Choi, Niaman Nazir, Melissa K Filippi, Dona McKinney, Jordyn Gunville, K Allen Greiner.
Feasibility of Implementing the All Nations Breath of Life Culturally Tailored Smoking Cessation Program for American Indians in Multi-Tribal Urban Communities.
Nicotine & Tobacco Research, Volume 20, Issue 5, 2 April 2018, Pages 552–560, https://doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntx030
 
Introduction: Prevalence of cigarette smoking is highest among American Indians, yet few culturally appropriate smoking cessation programs have yet been developed and tested for multi-tribal American Indian adult populations. This study examined implementation of the All Nations Breath of Life culturally tailored smoking cessation program in multi-tribal urban and suburban American Indian communities in seven locations across five states (N = 312). Methods: This single-arm study used community-based participatory research to conduct a 12-week intervention whose primary purpose was to curb commercial tobacco use among American Indians. Participants were followed through month 6 in person and month 12 via telephone. The primary outcome was continuous abstinence from recreational cigarette smoking at 6 months post-baseline, verified through voluntary provision of salivary cotinine levels. Results: At program completion (12 weeks post-baseline), 53.3% of program completers remained abstinent; labeling those lost to follow-up as smokers resulted in a 41.4% quit rate. At 6 months post-baseline (primary endpoint), 31.1% of retained participants quit smoking (p < .0001 compared to the highest quit rates among multi-tribal populations reported in the literature, 7%); final quit rate was 22.1% labeling those lost to follow-up as smokers (p = .002). Retention rate at endpoint was 71.2%. 12-month follow-up was attempted with all participants and had a retention rate of 49.0%. Of those participants reached, 34.0% were smoke-free. Conclusions: All Nations Breath of Life shows promise as a smoking cessation program for multi-tribal urban American Indian communities. It can be successfully implemented in a variety of urban settings. Implications: This is the first large feasibility study of a culturally tailored smoking cessation program for American Indians with good cessation and retention rates in a multi-tribal urban American.


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