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Update on NAQC’s environmental scan and new programs – Your feedback is needed!

Wednesday, June 17, 2020  
Posted by: Natalia Gromov

Update on NAQC’s environmental scan and new programs – Your feedback is needed!

Dear Colleagues,

Greetings! I hope you are well. We have a lot of news to share with you and hope you will send us your thoughts and feedback.

NAQC’s Environmental Scan

First, I’d like to provide an update on NAQC’s environmental scan. Last summer/fall, NAQC engaged an external consultant to conduct an environmental scan. The consultant interviewed 22 NAQC members and 5 staff. Thanks to those of you who participated in the interviews.

The key findings were framed around three questions:

1.What will quitlines look like in 5-10 years?

  • Move from quitlines to quitting services
  • Broadening the tobacco cessation team to work in health care and chronic diseases
  • Quitlines functioning as a hub for cessation team

2.What are NAQC’s strengths?

  • Research and technical assistance
  • Influential relationships and high-level perspective
  • Information dissemination/knowledge sharing

3.What can NAQC do to improve?

  • Be more agile, move more quickly on emerging issues
  • Do more on the national level where NAQC has been successful
  • Include non-traditional, non-tobacco partners and stakeholders
  • Keep an eye on characteristics of tobacco users and how they access services (e.g., technology-based services); build the findings into program activities
  • Improve communications with the field (publish more frequently and shorter publications such as position papers, fact sheets, etc.)
  • Focus on how to increase calls to quitlines, marketing quitlines
  • Strengthen capacity to disseminate information/knowledge exchange

NAQC has heard your feedback andis launching new programs that respond to many of your ideas on improving the way we work and the type of work we do as a Consortium. New programs for 2020 are described below. We hope to take action on all of your suggestions by 2021 and are seeking new grant funding to do so.

New Program Areas

NAQC is launching three Learning Communities that are responsive to what we learned from the environmental scan.

The Learning Communities:

  • Allow NAQC to be agile and responsive to emerging issues
  • Engage cessation experts within and external to NAQC along with non-traditional, non-tobacco partners and stakeholders
  • Create and disseminate more resources of shorter length
  • Build on NAQC’s strength for disseminating information and sharing knowledge
  • Build findings on how tobacco users access cessation services into our programs

The three Learning Communities will focus on youth cessation, vaping cessation and technology-mediated quitline services.

Each Learning Community will be established for 12-18 months

  • Month 1-3: Determine key questions to be answered
  • Months 4-8: Conduct literature and practice review. Write “brief” to be shared with Quitline community. Host webinar.
  • Months 9+: Identify about 10 members for each Learning Community, including Quitline experts and experts from other relevant fields. Convene 3-4 meetings to develop recommendations on the topic. Share the recommendations through a written report and webinar.

By September, we plan to share three short briefs – one on each topic – with you. We also plan to host webinars.

Below, I have included the key questions we hope to answer through the Learning Communities. I would like to ask you to:

  • Share your thoughts on any additional questions we should askwith lead staff.
  • Share your recommendations for members to serve on each Learning Community.

Learning Community on Youth Cessation

The key questions to be answered by the Learning Community on youth cessation are:

  1. What type of youth cessation services are currently available?
  2. How do these services for youth differ from cessation services for adult tobacco users (including information on specialized training, mode of delivery, use of medications, and relapse prevention)?
  3. How well are these services utilized by youth, including youth from priority populations? How are they promoted or marketed to youth?
  4. What level of engagement do youth have in services?
  5. What is the quit rate at one month? 7 months?
  6. What lessons can be learned from the field of adolescent development and behavior that are relevant to tobacco cessation?
  7. How can youth cessation services be improved?

Please provide your feedback on any additional questions that should be answered to lead staff:
Karen Rezai, MPH
Krezai@naquitline.org

Learning Community on Vaping (ENDS) Cessation

The key questions to be answered by the Learning Community on vaping (ENDS) cessation are:

  1. What type of vaping cessation services are currently available?
  2. How do these services differ from standard cessation services for combustible tobacco products (including information on specialized training, mode of delivery, promotion/marketing, use of medications and relapse prevention)?
  3. How well are these services utilized by youth/adult ENDS users, including users from priority populations?
  4. What level of engagement do ENDS users have in services?
  5. What is the quit rate at one month? 7 months?
  6. What relevant lessons can be learned from pharmacology, toxicology and other fields?
  7. How can vaping cessation services be improved?
  8. Other?

Please provide your feedback on any additional questions that should be answered to lead staff:
Karen Rezai, MPH
Krezai@naquitline.org

Learning Community on Technology-mediated Quitline Services

The key questions to be answered by the Learning Community on technology-mediated quitline services are:

  1. What is the current state of technology-oriented tobacco cessation/quitline services that are or may be effective in increasing smoking cessation? (What are evidence-based best practices? evidence-informed promising practices? emerging practices or novel approaches?)
  2. How do technology-oriented practices: a) Increase reach of quitlines? b) Impact efficacy or intensity of cessation services?
  3. In what ways, if any, does use of technology-oriented health education/coaching services in other fields assist our understanding?
  4. Across population groups, what is the impact for callers/users (qualitatively and quantitatively) of implementing these technologies?
  5. How do technology-oriented practices help meet the needs and preferences of different population groups, e.g., youth, people with behavioral health conditions?
  6. Do technology-oriented practices help/hinder engagement of priority populations?
  7. What are the financial costs/benefits of technology-oriented practices?
  8. What are capacity issues/priorities that impact implementing technology-oriented practices? What technology-oriented services have quitline providers implemented, or are considering implementing in the near future?

Please provide your feedback on any additional questions that should be answered to lead staff:
Christine Stein, PhD
cstein@naquitline.org

Dialogues on Leveraging New Information and Policy Change to Improve Quitlines

In addition to the Learning Communities, NAQC is aligning continuing programs with the findings of the environmental scan. You will see changes to our webinars and the way we utilize the listserv. In both venues, we hope to strengthen the quality of information dissemination and knowledge exchange.

Using webinars, discussion groups and the listserv, NAQC will facilitate dialogues on ways we can leverage important new research and policy changes to improve quitlines. In July, NAQC will host a webinar on ways quitlines can leverage the new Surgeon General Report (SGR) on Cessation.

If you have examples of how you are leveraging the new SGR, please share the information with NAQC. We are especially interested in hearing:

  • What do you view as the most important conclusions in the SGR for quitlines?
  • How can the quitline community best use the SGR to improve services and outcomes?
  • How do you plan to leverage the SGR to improve your Quitline?

Please provide your feedback to lead staff:
Karen Rezai, MPH
Krezai@naquitline.org

It has been 16 years since we established NAQC to improve the quality of quitlines and access to them. Our collaborative activities have had the best results when they are informed by all segments of the membership – the government agencies that fund quitlines, service providers, researchers and national organizations. I encourage you to get involved in these new programs and to let us know how we can continue to improve our activities.

My best wishes,

Linda Bailey, JD, MHS
President and CEO
North American Quitline Consortium


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